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gradientlair:

Black women on U.S.postage stamps. 

gradientlair:

Black women on U.S.postage stamps

gradientlair:

night-catches-us:

"The night sky is not lit up by one star, but by the billions of stars. Shine bright Black girls….Be bold. Be bright. Be blessed."

Just a few black girls/women who blew me away in 2013. I can’t wait to see what 2014 holds for them, for us, and for all Women of Color. 

So this is tear-worthy and smile-worthy and hope-worthy; exquisite. 

gradientlair:

Oh come on! So goddamn beautiful.

"

In the United States, assumptions of heterosexuality operate as a hegemonic or taken-for-granted ideology—to be heterosexual is considered normal, to be anything else is to become suspect. The system of sexual meanings associated with heterosexism becomes normalized to such a degree that they are often unquestioned.

For example, the use of the term sexuality itself references heterosexuality as normal, natural, and normative. The ideological dimension of heterosexism is embedded in binary thinking that deems heterosexuality as normal and other sexualities as deviant. Such thinking divides sexuality into two categories, namely, “normal” and “deviant” sexuality, and has great implications for understanding Black women’s sexualities.

Within assumptions of normalized heterosexuality, two important categories of “deviant” sexuality emerge. First, African or Black sexuality becomes constructed as an abnormal or pathologized heterosexuality. Long-standing ideas concerning the excessive sexual appetite of people of African descent conjured up in White imaginations generate gender-specific controlling images of the Black male rapist and the Black female jezebel, and they also rely on myths of Black hypersexuality. Within assumptions of normalized heterosexuality, regardless of individual behavior, being White marks the normal category of heterosexuality. In contrast, being Black signals the wild, out-of-control hyperheterosexuality of excessive sexual appetite.

Within assumptions of normalized heterosexuality, homosexuality emerges as a second important category of “deviant” sexuality. In this case, homosexuality constitutes an abnormal sexuality that becomes pathologized as heterosexuality’s opposite. Whereas the problem of African or Black sexual deviancy is thought to lie in Black hyperheterosexuality, the problem of homosexuality lies not in an excess of heterosexual desire, but in the seeming absence of it. Women who lack interest in men as sexual partners become pathologized as “frigid” if they claim heterosexuality and stigmatized as lesbians if they do not.

"

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Patricia Hill Collins

This is from the 2nd edition of her book Black Feminist Thought - Knowledge, Consciousness and The Politics of Empowerment. Even amidst heterosexually being presented as “normal,” there are categories of deviant sexuality within heterosexuality that are ascribed upon Black bodies. Even as some heterosexuals cling to theoretical “normalcy” of heterosexuality, which is heterosexist and homophobic to do so, sexuality as Black heterosexuals is still not viewed as “normal” anyway (when juxtaposed to Whites), even as Black heterosexuals still have heterosexual privilege (when juxtaposed to LGBTQ Black people). It’s important for heterosexual Black people to stand with LGBTQ Black people, always.

(via gradientlair)

Beyoncé's New Self-Titled Album Is A Manifesto of Black Womanhood and Freedom

gradientlair:

Beyoncé is a remarkable singer, artist, dancer, artistic visionary, Black woman, feminist (I’d say womanist, really), wife, mother, human being. I write this sentence and like…I can hear the haters (that I call miserys; the opposites of stans) screaming their heads off and thinking of horrible…

issarae:

Saturday SURPRISE! That new episode of @BlackandSexyTV’s #Roomieloverfriends is out and things get ROUGH!

Genius!!!!!!

chescaleigh:

As we all know, tomorrow is Scandal’s season 2 finale. To commemorate (and partly because we’re sick with worry) Luvvie and I created #ScandalBINGO cards to help get us through the night without having a breakdown. Feel free to play along with us tomorrow night!

Gradient Lair: "Mellie" Can Be What "Olivia" Cannot; "Fitz" Can Be What "Mellie" Cannot

Well articulated.

gradientlair:

Team “Olivia” or team “Mellie?”

Whenever a Scandal fan on Twitter states that they are team “Mellie” and they aren’t bound to patriarchy, sexism, respectability politics and heteronormative rigidity regarding sexuality such that they have to be against “Olivia,” as “the other woman,” I then…

gradientlair:

Film trailer for An Oversimplification of Beauty, presented by dream hampton, Jay-Z, Joy Bryant and Wyatt Cenac, written/directed by Terence Nance.

Looks good. Creative. See if a screening is near you, here.

Racism: A History | Watch Free Documentary Online

nefermaathotep:

A documentary which is exploring the impact of racism on a global scale, as part of the season of programmes marking the 200th anniversary of the abolition of slavery. Beginning by assessing the implications of the relationship between Europe, Africa and the Americas in the 15th century, it considers how racist ideas and practices developed in key religious and secular institutions, and how they showed up in writings by European philosophers Aristotle and Immanuel Kant.

Looking at Scientific Racism, invented during the 19th century, an ideology that drew on now discredited practices such as phrenology and provided an ideological justification for racism and slavery. These theories ultimately led to eugenics and Nazi racial policies of the master race. Some upsetting scenes.

The third and final episode of Racism: A History examines the impact of racism in the 20th Century. By 1900, European colonial expansion had reached deep into the heart of Africa. Under the rule of King Leopold II, The Belgian Congo was turned into a vast rubber plantation. Men, women and children who failed to gather their latex quotas would have their limbs dismembered. The country became the scene of one of the century’s greatest racial genocides, as an estimated 10 million Africans perished under colonial rule. Contains scenes which some viewers may find disturbing.

(via duke-of-doves)